Historical Fiction

#BookReview
Summer of ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand
@elinhilderbrand @littlebrown

#BookReview Summer of ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand @elinhilderbrand @littlebrownTitle: Summer of '69

Author: Elin Hilderbrand

Published by: Little Brown and Company on June 18, 2019

Genres: General Fiction, Women's Fiction, Historical Fiction

Pages: 432

Format: eBook, ARC

Source: Little Brown and Company, NetGalley

Book Rating: 9/10

 

Synopsis:

Welcome to the most tumultuous summer of the twentieth century! It’s 1969, and for the Levin family, the times they are a-changing. Every year the children have looked forward to spending the summer at their grandmother’s historic home in downtown Nantucket: but this year Blair, the oldest sister, is marooned in Boston, pregnant with twins and unable to travel. Middle sister Kirby, a nursing student, is caught up in the thrilling vortex of civil rights protests, a passion which takes her to Martha’s Vineyard with her best friend, Mary Jo Kopechne. Only son Tiger is an infantry soldier, recently deployed to Vietnam. Thirteen-year-old Jessie suddenly feels like an only child, marooned in the house with her out-of-touch grandmother who is hiding some secrets of her own. As the summer heats up, Teddy Kennedy sinks a car in Chappaquiddick, a man flies to the moon, and Jessie experiences some sinking and flying herself, as she grows into her own body and mind.

In her first “historical novel,” rich with the details of an era that shaped both a country and an island thirty miles out to sea, Elin Hilderbrand once again proves her title as queen of the summer novel.


Review:

Relevant, vivid, and absorbing!

Summer of ’69 is a nostalgic, domestic tale that takes us back to the idyllic island of Nantucket during a year when Vietnam was still raging, and Apollo 11 was finally going to put men on the moon, and into the lives of the blended Foley-Levin family as they navigate a summer of revelations, change, and new additions.

The writing is expressive and polished. The characters are genuine, troubled, and sympathetic. And the spirited plot is a delightful mix of summer fun, heartbreak, coming-of-age, secrets, wartime worries, adultery, racial segregation, women’s rights, and fresh starts.

Overall, Summer of ’69 is once again a beguiling, heartfelt, must-read summer tale by Hilderbrand that highlights the power of family and reminds us that even though we’ve come so far, in some respects we still have a long way to go.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                           

 

 

Thank you to Little, Brown and Company for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Elin Hilderbrand

Elin Hilderbrand is a mother of three, an avid runner, reader, and traveler, and the author of twenty-three novels. She grew up outside Philadelphia, and has lived on Nantucket for more than twenty years.

#BlogTour #BookReview
God’s Children by Mabli Roberts
#GodsChildren @honno @damppebbles #damppebblesblogtours

#BlogTour #BookReview God's Children by Mabli Roberts #GodsChildren @honno @damppebbles #damppebblesblogtours

#BlogTour #BookReview God’s Children by Mabli Roberts #GodsChildren @honno @damppebbles #damppebblesblogtoursTitle: God's Children

Author: Mabli Roberts

Published by: Honno Press on April 11, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 317

Format: eBook, ARC

Source: Damppebbles Blog Tours

Book Rating: 8/10

 

 

Synopsis:

‘Kate Marsden: nurse, intrepid adventurer, saviour of the lepers or devious manipulator, immoral and dishonest?’

As she lies on her deathbed visited by the ghosts of her past, who should we believe, Kate or those who accuse her of duplicity? Memory is a fickle thing: recollections may be frozen in time or distorted by the mirror of wishful thinking. Kate’s own story is one of incredible achievements, illicit love affairs and desperate longing; those of her accusers paint a very different portrait – of a woman determined on fame and fortune.

The reader navigates a narrative as fractured as the Siberian ice Kate crosses in search of a cure for leprosy, and as beautiful as Rose, her lost love, as the full picture emerges of a life lived when women were not expected to break the mould.


Review:

Insightful, engaging, and intriguing!

God’s Children is a fascinating interpretation about the life of Kate Marsden, a British nurse who in 1891 travelled across the Siberian wilderness to find a cure for Leprosy and to raise funds for the construction of a hospital where those afflicted with this degenerative disease could find care and comfort.

The prose is clear and precise. The characters are devout, steadfast, and independent. And the plot using a past/present style sweeps you back and forth between the late-1800s and early-1900s through a world filled with forbidden love, loss, deception, manipulation, riches, power, loneliness, hope, courage, and scandal.

I have to admit that I knew very little about Kate Marsden when I started God’s Children but Roberts did such a wonderful job of blending historical facts with compelling fiction that I was not only left entertained but questioning whether Marsden was truly a missionary with a pure heart or merely a selfish woman seeking a life above her means.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                     

 

 

Thank you to Mabli Roberts and Damppebbles Blog Tours for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Mabli Roberts

Mabli Roberts lives in a wild, mountainous part of Wales. She has an MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University and has worked as a Visiting Lecturer at the University of Wales, Newport. Most of her inspiration comes from her love of history and from long walks in the timeless landscape around her.

Mabli also writes as Paula Brackston, PJ Brackston and PJ Davy. Nutters was shortlisted for the Mind Book Award and The Witch’s Daughter was a New York Times bestseller.

Her work has been translated into five languages and is sold around the world. You can find out more about God's Children on the God's Children Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Gods-Children-1476228589147399/

 

#BookReview
Fatal Inheritance by Rachel Rhys
@MsTamarCohen @SimonSchusterCA

#BookReview Fatal Inheritance by Rachel Rhys @MsTamarCohen @SimonSchusterCATitle: Fatal Inheritance

Author: Rachel Rhys

Published by: Simon & Schuster Canada on June 11, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction, Mystery/Thriller

Pages: 400

Format: Paperback, ARC

Source: Simon & Schuster Canada

Book Rating: 10/10

 

 

Synopsis:

She didn’t have an enemy in the world…until she inherited a fortune.

London 1948: Eve Forrester is stuck in a loveless marriage, isolated in her gray and gloomy house when out of the blue, she receives a letter. A wealthy stranger has left her a mysterious inheritance but in order to find out more, she must travel to the glittering French Riviera.

There, Eve discovers she has been bequeathed an enchanting villa overlooking the Mediterranean Sea and suddenly, life could not be more glamorous. But while she rubs shoulders with the rich and famous, challengers to her unexplained fortune begin to emerge—challengers who would love to see Eve gone forever.

Alone in paradise, Eve must unlock the story behind her surprise bequest—before her unexpected twist of fate turns deadly…

Fatal Inheritance is an intoxicating story of dysfunctional families and long-hidden secrets, set against the decadence of the Côte d’Azur.


Review:

Picturesque, mysterious, and incredibly captivating!

Fatal Inheritance is an alluring, compelling tale predominantly set in the idyllic French Riviera during 1948 that takes you into the lives of the rich and glamourous Lesters. They are affluent. They are privileged. And like most families with money and power everything is not always as it seems and behind all the fame and fortune hides an abundance of lies, secrets, temptation, scandals, secrets, heartbreak and tragedy.

The prose is polished and lush. The characters are multi-layered, alluring, and materialistic. And the plot is a well-paced, sweeping saga filled with familial drama, love, loss, mystique, heartbreak, romance, rivalry, greed, red herrings and jealousy.

Overall, Fatal Inheritance is a beautifully crafted, exceptionally absorbing novel that transports you to another time and place and immerses you so thoroughly in the decadence, lifestyle, luxuries, and scandalous behaviour of the characters you never want to put it down. It is a true guilty pleasure and undoubtedly one of my favourite novels of the year.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                            

 

 

Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Rachel Rhys

Rachel Rhys is the pen-name of a successful psychological suspense author. A Dangerous Crossing is her debut novel under this name. The story is inspired by a real diary which the author discovered by accident while helping her mother move house. It was written with care and attention by a servant girl who travelled from England to Australia on a cruise liner in the late 1930s.

Rachel Rhys lives in North London with her family, including a much-loved dog.

#BookReview
The Daughter’s Tale
by Armando Lucas Correa
@ArmandoCorrea @SimonSchusterCA @AtriaBooks

#BookReview The Daughter’s Tale by Armando Lucas Correa @ArmandoCorrea @SimonSchusterCA @AtriaBooksTitle: The Daughter's Tale

Author: Armando Lucas Correa

Published by: Atria Books on May 7, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 320

Format: Paperback, ARC

Source: Simon & Schuster Canada

Book Rating: 9/10

 

 

Synopsis:

BERLIN, 1939. The dreams that Amanda Sternberg and her husband, Julius, had for their daughters are shattered when the Nazis descend on Berlin, burning down their beloved family bookshop and sending Julius to a concentration camp. Desperate to save her children, Amanda flees toward the south of France, where the widow of an old friend of her husband’s has agreed to take her in. Along the way, a refugee ship headed for Cuba offers another chance at escape and there, at the dock, Amanda is forced to make an impossible choice that will haunt her for the rest of her life. Once in Haute-Vienne, her brief respite is inter­rupted by the arrival of Nazi forces, and Amanda finds herself in a labor camp where she must once again make a heroic sacrifice.

NEW YORK, 2015. Eighty-year-old Elise Duval receives a call from a woman bearing messages from a time and country that she forced herself to forget. A French Catholic who arrived in New York after World War II, Elise is shocked to discover that the letters were from her mother, written in German during the war. Despite Elise’s best efforts to stave off her past, seven decades of secrets begin to unravel.

Based on true events, The Daughter’s Tale chronicles one of the most harrowing atrocities perpetrated by the Nazis during the war. Heart­breaking and immersive, it is a beautifully crafted family saga of love, survival, and redemption.


Review:

Vivid, stirring, and immersive!

The Daughter’s Tale is a gripping, moving story set predominantly in Germany and France during WWII, as well as present-day New York City, that follows the lives of the Sternbergs, a young Jewish family who at a time of horrific persecution and extreme brutality are forced to make unimaginable choices and heartwrenching sacrifices to keep those they love safe.

The prose is perceptive and descriptive. The characters are anguished, courageous, and resilient. And the plot using a past/present style unfolds chronologically into a tale of life, love, loss, family, friendship, injustice, guilt, self-identity, ancestry, war, bravery, and survival.

Overall, The Daughter’s Tale is a hauntingly tragic, insightful, heartrending tale that highlights the inconceivable hardships, suffering, and horrors endured during a heinous time in history and reminds us of the incredible power of familial bonds.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                            

 

 

Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Armando Lucas Correa

Armando Lucas Correa is an award-winning journalist, editor, author, and the recipient of several awards from the National Association of Hispanic Publications and the Society of Professional Journalism. He is the author of the international bestseller The German Girl, which is now being published in thirteen languages. He lives in New York City with his partner and their three children.

Photograph by Héctor O. Torres.

#BookReview
The Spanish Promise by Karen Swan
@KarenSwan1 @PGCBooks @panmacmillan

#BookReview The Spanish Promise by Karen Swan @KarenSwan1 @PGCBooks @panmacmillanTitle: The Spanish Promise

Author: Karen Swan

Published by: Pan Macmillan on May 1, 2019

Genres: Women's Fiction, Contemporary Romance, Historical Fiction

Pages: 384

Format: Paperback

Source: Publishers Group Canada

Book Rating: 10/10

 

 

Synopsis:

Charlotte, a wealth counsellor who knows from personal experience the complications that a sudden inheritance can bring, helps her clients navigate the emotional side effects of sudden wealth syndrome. When she is asked by Mateo Mendoza, heir to a huge Spanish estate, to fly to Madrid to help resolve an issue in his father’s will, she’s confident it will be straightforward. The timing isn’t great as Charlotte’s due to get married the following week, but once her client signs on the dotted line, Charlotte can return to her life in London and her wedding, and live happily ever after. Marrying Stephen might not fill her with excitement, but she doesn’t want to live in the fast lane anymore – safe and predictable is good.

But Carlos Mendoza’s final bequest opens up a generation of secrets, and Charlotte finds herself compelled to unravel the mystery. As Charlotte digs deeper, she uncovers the story of a family divided by Spain’s Civil War, and of a love affair across the battle lines that ended in tragedy.

And while she is consumed in the drama of the Mendozas, Charlotte’s own tragic past catches up with her, threatening to overturn everything in her life she’s worked so hard to build.


Review:

Evocative, mysterious, and incredibly enchanting!

The Spanish Promise is an alluring, mesmerizing tale predominantly set in Spain during the late 1930s, as well as present day, that takes you into the lives of both the prosperous, successful, multi-generational Fairfax and Mendoza families. But like most families with money, power, and privilege everything is not always as it seems, and behind the designer clothes and beautiful houses hides an abundance of secrets, betrayals, scandals, rivalry, conflict, and heartbreak.

The prose is seamless and eloquent. The characters are perceptive, intriguing, and scarred. And the plot, including all the subplots, intertwine and unravel effortlessly into a vividly satisfying tale of life, loss, family, friendship, self-discovery, regret, deception, love, duty, honour, and the turmoil of the Spanish Civil War.

The Spanish Promise is another magical, heartwarming tale by Swan that does a beautiful job of highlighting her exceptional ability to portray memorable characters, idyllic places, and historically troubling times that stay with you long after you finish the final page.

 

This book is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                  

 

 

Thank you to Karen Swan and PGC Books for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Karen Swan

Karen Swan began her career in fashion journalism before giving it all up to raise her three children and a puppy, and to pursue her ambition of becoming a writer. She lives in the forest outside Sussex, England, writing her books in a treehouse overlooking the Downs.

An internationally bestselling author, her numerous books include The Rome Affair, The Paris Secret, Christmas Under the Stars, and The Christmas Secret. 

Photograph by Alexander James

#BookReview
The Survivors by Kate Furnivall
@KateFurnivall @SimonSchusterCA

#BookReview The Survivors by Kate Furnivall @KateFurnivall @SimonSchusterCATitle: The Survivors

Author: Kate Furnivall

Published by: Simon & Schuster on April 30, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 448

Source: Simon & Schuster Canada

Book Rating: 9/10

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Directly I saw him, I knew he had to die.’
 
Germany, 1945. Klara Janowska and her daughter Alicja have walked for weeks to get to Graufeld Displaced Persons camp. In the cramped, dirty, dangerous conditions they, along with 3,200 others, are the lucky ones. They have survived and will do anything to find a way back home.
 
But when Klara recognises a man in the camp from her past, a deadly game of cat and mouse begins.

He knows exactly what she did during the war to save her daughter.

She knows his real identity.

What will be the price of silence? And will either make it out of the camp alive?


Review:

Haunting, moving, and gritty!

The Survivors is an edgy, poignant tale that sweeps you away to the Graufeld Displaced Persons Camp, post-WWII, where thousands of people live in cramped conditions with basic rations while they struggle to comprehend the horrors they’ve endured, find love ones possibly lost forever, protect their beloved, rebuild lives, and for some hide from the justice they deserve.

The prose is tense and mysterious. The characters are scared, vulnerable, and resilient. And the plot, set in Germany during the mid-1940s, is an exceptionally enthralling tale about life, love, strength, bravery, deception, loss, injustice, hope, survival, the aftermath of war, and the powerful bonds between a mother and her daughter.

Overall, The Survivors is a magical blend of historical facts, cat-and-mouse mystique, thrilling fiction, and heartwrenching emotion that does a beautiful job of reminding us that humanity can not only be barbaric and cruel but also incredibly compassionate, resilient, and kind.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                            

 

 

Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Kate Furnivall

Kate Furnivall is the author of eight novels, including the international bestseller The Russian Concubine. She lives in Devon.

Photograph by Kate Wright.

#BlogTour #BookReview
The Girl in the Pink Raincoat
by Arlene Hughes
@alrenehughes @ HoZ_Books

#BlogTour #BookReview The Girl in the Pink Raincoat by Arlene Hughes @alrenehughes @ HoZ_BooksTitle: The Girl in the Pink Raincoat

Author: Arlene Hughes

Published by: Head of Zeus on March 1, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction, Women's Fiction

Pages: 368

Format: eBook, ARC

Source: Head of Zeus, NetGalley

Book Rating: 8/10

 

Synopsis:

In wartime it takes courage to follow your heart.

Manchester, 1939.

Everyone hated the heat and the deafening noise, but for Gracie the worst thing was the smell of chemicals that turned her stomach every morning when she arrived at the Rosenberg Raincoats factory.

Gracie is a girl on the factory floor. Jacob is the boss’s charismatic nephew. When they fall in love, it seems as if the whole world is against them – especially Charlie Nuttall, who also works at the factory and has always wanted Gracie for himself.

But worse is to come when Jacob disappears and Gracie is devastated, vowing to find him. Can she solve the mystery of his whereabouts? Gracie will need all her strength and courage to find a happy ending.


Review:

Affecting, absorbing, and twisty!

The Girl in the Pink Raincoat is an intriguing story that takes you back to the streets of Manchester during the late 1930s, and into the life of Gracie Earnshaw a cheery, resilient, young woman who suddenly finds herself confused, overwhelmed, and heartbroken after her bridegroom-to-be unexpectedly goes missing, and family secrets threaten everything she believed about her past.

The writing is clear and fluid. The characters are resilient, hardworking, and determined. And the plot, including all the subplots, intertwine and unravel subtly into a compelling tale of life, loss, love, family, heartbreak, friendship, secrets, betrayal, obsession, and war.

Overall, The Girl in the Pink Raincoat is an uplifting, atmospheric, emotive tale about surviving wartime, taking chances, following your heart, and the power of first love.

 

This book is available now.  

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from the following link.

                              

 

 

Thank you to Head of Zeus for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Arlene Hughes

Alrene Hughes grew up in Belfast and has lived in Manchester for most of her adult life. She worked for British Telecom and the BBC before training as an English teacher. After teaching for twenty years, she retired and now writes full-time.

 

         

 

For more information on Head of Zeus visit them at:

Website | Twitter | Facebook

#BlogTour #GuestPost
The Red Gene by Barbara Lamplugh #Barbara Lamplugh
@UrbaneBooks #LoveBooksGroupTours

#BlogTour #GuestPost The Red Gene by Barbara Lamplugh #Barbara Lamplugh @UrbaneBooks #LoveBooksGroupToursTitle: The Red Gene

Author: Barbara Lamplugh

Published by: Urbane Publications on April 18, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 360

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

When Rose, a young English nurse with humanitarian ideals, decides to volunteer in the Spanish Civil War, she is little prepared for the experiences that await her.

Working on one front after another, witness to all the horrors of war, she falls in love with a Republican fighter, Miguel. In 1939 as defeat becomes inevitable, Rose is faced with a decision that will change her life and leave her with lasting scars.

Interspersed with Rose’s story is that of Consuelo, a girl growing up in a staunchly Catholic family on the other side of the ideological divide. Never quite belonging, treated unkindly, she discovers at a young age that she was adopted but her attempts to learn more about her origins are largely thwarted.

It falls to the third generation, to Consuelo’s daughter Marisol, born in the year of Franco’s death and growing up in a rapidly changing Spain, to investigate the dark secrets of her family and find the answers that have until now eluded her mother.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy of this novel from your favourite retailer or from the following link!

 

 

And now Barbara Lamplugh with:

 

FACT TO FICTION

I didn’t really think about writing fiction until I had children. My first two books were travel narratives, the first describing my overland journey by truck to Kathmandu in 1974, the second an account of my 1975 trip on the Trans-Siberian Railway and by boat to Japan. It was soon after I returned from that second trip that we decided to start a family, which obviously meant letting go of any ideas for more extensive travels – at least for the foreseeable future. But it didn’t mean goodbye to writing. I could conquer my addiction to travel (becoming a mother brought its own rewards) but I saw no reason to go cold turkey on my recently acquired addiction to writing. It would just have to be a different kind of writing.

I wrote my first novel while I was pregnant and carried on writing fiction throughout the years of bringing up my children. I love creating characters and a story, which fiction allows me to do. It involves the imagination in a way that travel writing doesn’t yet I can still use my descriptive, travel writing skills to build a setting that is both vivid and authentic. It seemed only logical to set my novels in Britain where the culture was familiar. After all, I’d been immersed in it all my life, absorbed it from birth.As it happened, none of those six novels was published – whether from bad luck, lack of persistence or because I was still honing my skills – but they served to keep my creativity alive and taught me some useful lessons.

When I moved to Spain in 1999, my previous travel writing experience came into its own again. I found work as a features writer for the English magazine Living Spainand also wrote occasional pieces for The Guardian. At the same time, I continued to write fiction. It took a few years but there came a point when I began to feel sufficiently connected with the culture of my adopted city and country to locate my writing as well as my life there. Secrets of the Pomegranate, my first published novel, was set in Granada, though the three main protagonists were English by birth. To write from the perspective of Spanish characters, whether historical or contemporary, presented a much greater challenge. It felt imperative that what I wrote should be authentic enough to convince Spanish as well as native English readers. But did I have the necessary in-depth understanding of the Spanish mind-set and culture, contemporary and historical? After all, I was an outsider here too.

In writing The Red Gene, I took on this challenge. After years living in a country, you get the flavour, the feel of how people think and speak, an insider’s familiarity with the culture. It’s more than just the landscape, the customs and habits, the daily routines; it’s something much more fluid and difficult to define, the psyche of a nation, shaped by its history. Of course, each of us is unique, the differences between individuals huge: it’s important to avoid generalisations and stereotypes. And perhaps I’m being a little arrogant in thinking that I’ve managed to capture this, even after twenty years. What I do know is that I now feel out of touch with life in my birth country. I’m not sure I could write convincingly any more of contemporary life in Britain. Cultures don’t stand still and some of the cultural references familiar to my family and British friends no longer mean much to me.

As I became more absorbed in my new country and learnt more about its recent history, had conversations with – in particular – older Spaniards, the story of The Red Gene began to form in my mind and eventually became compelling.

 

About Barbara Lamplugh

Barbara Lamplugh was born and grew up in London. An experienced traveller, she described her journeys in 'Kathmandu by Truck' and 'Trans-Siberia by Rail' published by Roger Lascelles. In 1999, spurred by the challenge of living in a different culture, she headed for Granada in Spain, where she still lives, inspired by views of hills and the Alhambra from her sunny terrace. A regular features writer for the magazine 'Living Spain', she has also written for 'The Guardian', 'The Times' and published her first novel Secrets of the Pomegranate in 2015.

 

Thank you to Barbara Lamplugh for being featured on my blog today!

 

#BookReview
The Temptation of Gracie
by Santa Montefiore
@SantaMontefiore @SimonSchusterCA

#BookReview The Temptation of Gracie by Santa Montefiore @SantaMontefiore @SimonSchusterCATitle: The Temptation of Gracie

Author: Santa Montefiore

Published by: Simon & Schuster UK on April 16, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 416

Format: Paperback, ARC

Source: Simon & Schuster Canada

Book Rating: 8.5/10

 

 

Synopsis:

Love may be lost, but it’s not gone forever.

When Gracie Burton stumbles upon a weeklong cooking course at Castello Montefosco, a castle in the sun-kissed Tuscan countryside, she cannot resist the opportunity to revisit the past she left behind in Italy. Since her husband’s death eight years earlier, Gracie has grown apart from her daughter, Carina, a high-powered businesswoman in London and her granddaughter, Anastasia, who would rather spend her time on her phone than with her family, but both women decide to join her. Little do they know that a lifetime of secrets await them in Italy.

Over the course of the week, Gracie reveals the truth about what has drawn her back to the castle and its owner, the mysterious Count Bassanelli. Carina and Anastasia are shocked to discover that Gracie spent fifteen years in Italy as an apprentice to her uncle, a renowned art restorer and collector. While there, she fell madly in love. Now, forty-one years later, she has returned in hopes of righting past wrongs. With the help of Mamma Bernadetta’s magical recipes and the kindness of her fellow guests, Gracie reconnects with her family and together, all three women learn that love once lost, is not gone forever.

The Temptation of Gracie is a poignant, timeless tale of grand romance, a story of women through the generations, and a reminder that it’s never too late to love.


Review:

Atmospheric, immersive, and delightfully moving!

The Temptation of Gracie is a classic, magical tale that sweeps you away to Tuscany, Italy and into the life of Gracie Burton, as she revisits the past, repairs strained relationships, forges new friendships, and searches for love long lost.

The prose is seamless and lush. The characters are complex, independent, and memorable. And the plot moves between past and present effortlessly spinning a beautifully tender, beguiling tale of life, loss, family, friendship, revelations, secrets, guilt, forbidden love, art, passion, and food.

Once again with The Temptation of Gracie, Montefiore has written another skillfully plotted, multi-generational, family saga that has just the right amount of intrigue, colourful history, and enduring passion to be pleasing to both lovers of historical fiction and romance.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                  

 

 

Thank you to Simon & Schuster Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Santa Montefiore

Santa Montefiore’s books have been translated into twenty languages and have sold more than four million copies in England and Europe. She is married to writer Simon Sebag Montefiore. They live with their two children, Lily and Sasha, in London.

Photograph by Santa Montefiore

#BookReview
The Glovemaker by Ann Weisgarber
@AnnWeisgarber @MantleBooks @PGCBooks

#BookReview The Glovemaker by Ann Weisgarber @AnnWeisgarber @MantleBooks @PGCBooksTitle: The Glovemaker

Author: Ann Weisgarber

Published by: Mantle Books on April 9, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 304

Format: Paperback, ARC

Source: Publishers Group Canada

Book Rating: 8.5/10

 

 

Synopsis:

From the critically acclaimed author of The Personal History of Rachel DuPree, comes a stunning historical novel for fans of Cold Mountain.

For almost four years, men came to my cabin carrying trouble on their backs, each one haunted and looking over their shoulders. They showed up during the spring, they appeared in the summer and early fall. But never now, never in January…

Winter, 1888. In the inhospitable lands of Utah Territory, glovemaker Deborah Tyler awaits her husband’s return home after months working across the state. But as his due date comes and goes without a word, Deborah starts to fear the worst. Facing a future alone, matters are only compounded when a desperate stranger arrives on her doorstep. And with him, trouble.

For although the man claims just to need a place to rest for the night, he wouldn’t be here in the bitter month of January if he wasn’t on the run. And where he goes, lawmen are sure to follow. Lawmen who wouldn’t think twice about burning Deborah’s home to the ground if they thought she’d helped their fugitive.

With her husband’s absence felt stronger by the minute, Deborah must make a decision. A decision that will change her life forever.


Review:

Unnerving, atmospheric, and insightful!

The Glovemaker is an immersive tale that sweeps you away to the harsh territory of canyon country, Southern Utah during the late 1880s when the strict rules and practice of polygamy by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints prompted even some of their most faithful followers to drift away to remote areas and create new, smaller communities of their own.

The prose is concise and expressive. The characters are hardy, resourceful, isolated, and tormented. And the plot, with an underlying current of dread, is a suspenseful, emotional filled tale of family, faith, loss, love, secrets, persecution, determination, morality, community, and violence.

Overall, The Glovemaker is a beautifully written, powerful, unique story, and even though there is not much known about these small groups of Mormon nonconformists, Weisberger has done a remarkable job of taking the barest of historical facts and surrounding them with fiction that is richly described, mysterious, believable, and exceptionally fascinating.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links.

                                            

 

 

Thank you to Publishers Group Canada for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Ann Weisgarber

Ann Weisgarber was born and raised in Kettering, Ohio. She has lived in Boston, Massachusetts, and Iowa, but now splits her time between Sugar
Land and Galveston, Texas. Her first novel,The Personal History of Rachel Dupree, was longlisted for the Orange Prize and shortlisted for the Orange Prize for New Writers. Her follow-up book, The Promise, was a finalist in the Western Writers of America Best Historical Fiction Awards.The Glovemaker is Ann's third novel.

 

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