Publisher: Urbane Publications

#BlogTour #GuestPost
Tight Lies by Ted Denton
@UrbaneBooks @LoveBooksGroup #TedDenton #LoveBooksGroupTours

#BlogTour #GuestPost Tight Lies by Ted Denton @UrbaneBooks @LoveBooksGroup #TedDenton #LoveBooksGroupToursTitle: Tight Lies

Author: Ted Denton

Published by Urbane Publications on July 4, 2019

Genres: Mystery/Thriller

Pages: 360

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Ted Denton’s explosive debut novel is an exhilarating action thriller pitching the privileged, seductive world of a professional sports agent against a backdrop of political double-dealing, corporate corruption and brutal violence.

A young Daniel Ratchet arrives in Spain to begin his dream job as a golf agent on the European Tour. In London, the Russian Rublex Corporation, with its history mired in ‘Vory‘ mafia criminality, is working on a huge gas deal off the Falkland Islands with the British government. Veteran civil servant Derek Hemmings is tasked to rubber-stamp the deal for the Foreign Office.

But things are not what they seem … With the help of Wallace, a cantankerous old golf coach, Daniel discovers match fixing, fraud and corruption on the Tour, all at the seeming behest of Rublex. A thorn in the Russians’ side, Daniel is kidnapped before he can expose the truth. Wallace, needing help, contacts an old army buddy who deploys violent loose cannon Tom Hunter on a mission to save him.

A tense race against time ensues, both to rescue Daniel from the clutches of the Vory and for Hemmings in Whitehall to prove that the deadly deal is corrupt. The stakes are high. As the body count mounts will the volatile Hunter reveal the truth or will he be too late?

Dead or alive, the truth always comes at a cost.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy from your favourite retailer or from the following link!

 

And now Ted Denton with:

 

CHARACTER PROFILE

Tom Hunter is the violent protagonist of the Ted Denton thriller Tight Lies. A blunt instrument deployed by The Unit, a private kidnap-rescue organisation assembled by the shadowy Charles Hand who is known ubiquitously as the Hand of God, Hunter is a powerful, larger-than-life character to write. Relentless, honest, unpredictable, good humoured, violent and consistently flawed. He represents the extremes that can exist in all of us, serving perhaps as an exemplar of the fragility of the common human condition. As a consequence, there is a relished freedom that accompanies writing this character.  He is not afraid of the consequences of his savage actions nor ashamed by his often-puerile attitudes which may often be incongruous with a decent, moral and politically correct society. The writing can reflect this. Hunter is a visceral character. He is the anti-hero that the reader can at once find repellent yet remains inexorably drawn towards, unable to look away from, compelled to know more. He straddles the line of right and wrong and that incongruity can make the reader feel uncomfortable as they have to work to understand how they do actually feel about him versus the response that their own relationship with society demands of them.

Despite accepting what he is, at a base level, with an overt bloodlust and rampant carnal appetites for sex, drugs, coffee and alcohol, Tom has a ready, often self-depreciating sense of humour and underlying intelligence which belie the abhorrent machismo and unedifying sexist behaviour – for which there is no excuse given.

He wears his manifold mistakes and challenges with an uncurrent of bravado. Whilst Hunter displays self-awareness, embracing a relentless torrent of painful introspection through the recognition of his own personal demons, it cannot be said that he truly likes himself. Nevertheless, he embraces his fierce capabilities and understands what drives him. The deep contradictions that ride as an unwelcome passenger with all of us, however much we may battle against them, are evident in his ever-present discomfort with normality. Hunter is haunted by persistent waking nightmares left over from a life lived absorbed in so much violence, addiction, and of his true love brutally ripped from him as a consequence of his own bad choices. The disconnection he feels from belonging within a civilised society is exacerbated by his pervasive feeling that he doesn’t actually deserve that privilege. Instead Tom clings onto his sanity by his ragged fingertips and a pervasive belief that if he just keeps moving forward relentlessly and at least makes an attempt to show some signs of conventional social norms and interaction, then he might just get away with it unnoticed. Tom Hunter’s lust for extremes in all things is simply perpetuated by this overriding need to feel something relatable. To feel alive. The daily torment he endures from the terror of his retrograde memories may serve to generate the unwelcome illusion to him that he is already residing within a version of Hell itself. The physiological responses that he craves to pain, adrenaline and high octane risk-taking therefore, which are induced by the human body’s real-world stimuli and response mechanisms, serve to prove to Tom Hunter and to his sense of self, that he is still very much alive and kicking. And he is determined to make a dent in the world in order to prove that to himself.

 

About Ted Denton

Author Ted Denton was offered a bursary at an early age to serve as a commissioned officer within the British armed forces. Fascinated with both geo-political relations and bipartisan negotiation, Ted has engaged with international governments, political faculties and Non-Governmental-Organisations (NGOs).

Ted has forged an exciting career through his founding of a private international consultancy. He undertakes extensive global travel and exploration. Ted is passionate about writing, boxing and adventuring

 

Thank you to Ted Denton for being featured on my blog today!

 

#BlogTour #GuestPost
The Red Gene by Barbara Lamplugh #Barbara Lamplugh
@UrbaneBooks #LoveBooksGroupTours

#BlogTour #GuestPost The Red Gene by Barbara Lamplugh #Barbara Lamplugh @UrbaneBooks #LoveBooksGroupToursTitle: The Red Gene

Author: Barbara Lamplugh

Published by Urbane Publications on April 18, 2019

Genres: Historical Fiction

Pages: 360

 

 

 

 

Synopsis:

When Rose, a young English nurse with humanitarian ideals, decides to volunteer in the Spanish Civil War, she is little prepared for the experiences that await her.

Working on one front after another, witness to all the horrors of war, she falls in love with a Republican fighter, Miguel. In 1939 as defeat becomes inevitable, Rose is faced with a decision that will change her life and leave her with lasting scars.

Interspersed with Rose’s story is that of Consuelo, a girl growing up in a staunchly Catholic family on the other side of the ideological divide. Never quite belonging, treated unkindly, she discovers at a young age that she was adopted but her attempts to learn more about her origins are largely thwarted.

It falls to the third generation, to Consuelo’s daughter Marisol, born in the year of Franco’s death and growing up in a rapidly changing Spain, to investigate the dark secrets of her family and find the answers that have until now eluded her mother.

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy of this novel from your favourite retailer or from the following link!

 

 

And now Barbara Lamplugh with:

 

FACT TO FICTION

I didn’t really think about writing fiction until I had children. My first two books were travel narratives, the first describing my overland journey by truck to Kathmandu in 1974, the second an account of my 1975 trip on the Trans-Siberian Railway and by boat to Japan. It was soon after I returned from that second trip that we decided to start a family, which obviously meant letting go of any ideas for more extensive travels – at least for the foreseeable future. But it didn’t mean goodbye to writing. I could conquer my addiction to travel (becoming a mother brought its own rewards) but I saw no reason to go cold turkey on my recently acquired addiction to writing. It would just have to be a different kind of writing.

I wrote my first novel while I was pregnant and carried on writing fiction throughout the years of bringing up my children. I love creating characters and a story, which fiction allows me to do. It involves the imagination in a way that travel writing doesn’t yet I can still use my descriptive, travel writing skills to build a setting that is both vivid and authentic. It seemed only logical to set my novels in Britain where the culture was familiar. After all, I’d been immersed in it all my life, absorbed it from birth.As it happened, none of those six novels was published – whether from bad luck, lack of persistence or because I was still honing my skills – but they served to keep my creativity alive and taught me some useful lessons.

When I moved to Spain in 1999, my previous travel writing experience came into its own again. I found work as a features writer for the English magazine Living Spainand also wrote occasional pieces for The Guardian. At the same time, I continued to write fiction. It took a few years but there came a point when I began to feel sufficiently connected with the culture of my adopted city and country to locate my writing as well as my life there. Secrets of the Pomegranate, my first published novel, was set in Granada, though the three main protagonists were English by birth. To write from the perspective of Spanish characters, whether historical or contemporary, presented a much greater challenge. It felt imperative that what I wrote should be authentic enough to convince Spanish as well as native English readers. But did I have the necessary in-depth understanding of the Spanish mind-set and culture, contemporary and historical? After all, I was an outsider here too.

In writing The Red Gene, I took on this challenge. After years living in a country, you get the flavour, the feel of how people think and speak, an insider’s familiarity with the culture. It’s more than just the landscape, the customs and habits, the daily routines; it’s something much more fluid and difficult to define, the psyche of a nation, shaped by its history. Of course, each of us is unique, the differences between individuals huge: it’s important to avoid generalisations and stereotypes. And perhaps I’m being a little arrogant in thinking that I’ve managed to capture this, even after twenty years. What I do know is that I now feel out of touch with life in my birth country. I’m not sure I could write convincingly any more of contemporary life in Britain. Cultures don’t stand still and some of the cultural references familiar to my family and British friends no longer mean much to me.

As I became more absorbed in my new country and learnt more about its recent history, had conversations with – in particular – older Spaniards, the story of The Red Gene began to form in my mind and eventually became compelling.

 

About Barbara Lamplugh

Barbara Lamplugh was born and grew up in London. An experienced traveller, she described her journeys in 'Kathmandu by Truck' and 'Trans-Siberia by Rail' published by Roger Lascelles. In 1999, spurred by the challenge of living in a different culture, she headed for Granada in Spain, where she still lives, inspired by views of hills and the Alhambra from her sunny terrace. A regular features writer for the magazine 'Living Spain', she has also written for 'The Guardian', 'The Times' and published her first novel Secrets of the Pomegranate in 2015.

 

Thank you to Barbara Lamplugh for being featured on my blog today!

 

#GuestPost
Implant (Gardener and Reilly Crime Series #3)
by Ray Clark @T1LOM @UrbaneBooks
#Lovebooksgrouptours #IMPLANT

#GuestPost Implant (Gardener and Reilly Crime Series #3) by Ray Clark @T1LOM @UrbaneBooks #Lovebooksgrouptours #IMPLANTTitle: Implant

Author: Ray Clark

Series: Gardener and Reilly Crime Series #3

Published by Urbane Publications on August 9, 2018

Genres: Mystery/Thriller, Police Procedural

Pages: 376

 

 

 

Synopsis:

Bramfield, near Leeds, a sleepy little market town nestled on the borders of West and North Yorkshire. Detectives Stewart Gardener and Sean Reilly discover the naked corpse of Alex Wilson, nailed to the wall of a cellar in his uncle’s hardware store. His lips are sewn together and his body bears only one mark, a fresh scar near his abdomen.

Within forty-eight hours, their investigation results in dead ends, more victims, no suspects and very little in the way of solid evidence. Gardener and Reilly have a problem and a question on their hands: are the residents of Bramfield prepared for one of history’s most sadistic killers, The Tooth Fairy?

Implant is the perfect read for fans of Peter May, Mark Billingham and Peter James.

 

And now a little word from Ray Clark:

Whenever I am invited to do a book talk I always open using the same format for my audience. I try to ascertain how many of them are readers and how many are writers. I then ask the question: what do you feel is the most important part of a book? The answers are varied and interesting. I eventually answer the question myself, which is always two fold.

            As a reader, without doubt the most important part of the book for me is the protagonist, the main character. He or she has to be three-dimensional and give me a very good reason to keep turning the page. It has to be a character who lights up the text whenever he appears because you basically have no idea what he or she is going to do or say. Thomas Harris is a man who proves that point very well. He created, in Hannibal Lecter, a complete and utter – yet extremely intelligent – monster. A man who actually enjoys torturing and eating people, who is guilty of the most heinous crimes. Yet, when we see the man about to meet his demise in the book, Hannibal, as Mason Verger is going to feed Lecter to the pigs, we feel sorry for him. His hands and feet are bound and he’s been hoisted up on to a lifting device so that he can be lowered slowly into the pen. That way, both the pigs and Verger can devour every second – as does the reader. The power of that writing and the emotion it creates is, for me, sheer genius.

            As a writer, it has to be first and foremost, your research. For me, from a writing point of view, good research, sparingly used is what will keep people returning to your work time and again. You have to show the reader that you know what you are talking about – even if you don’t. Research can be used in a variety of ways: to intensify a plot, or to build up a really believable character. For me it’s almost always the most fun part of the book. When I wrote the cross genre novel, Seven Secrets, set against the background of the NYMR, I was so absorbed in the research about the stations and the line itself, that the writing became secondary, but it’s what I believe made the book so easy to write in the end. I love researching novels: it’s a bit like opening a well-wrapped present: you never know what you are going to find when you finally open the box.

Another interesting bit of research I became involved in was for a book entitled, The Priest’s Hole (later re-released as Resurrection). For years I’d wanted to write something about Ouija Boards. My concern was that I felt everything might already have been done. So I postponed writing about them until I could find the right vehicle. Whilst researching something completely different one day, I was studying an article on ancient wisdom and secret sects, and became embroiled in Druidism, reading about a battle that took place on the island of Anglesey in A.D. 61, when it was believed that the Roman’s came ashore, and in a pretty fierce battle, wiped out the last of the Druid’s in the UK. One phrase in that article became the vehicle for the book, which led me to researching the Ouija Board more seriously. Perhaps the most fascinating this I discovered was that the boards and the spirits are not always bad. The English writer Sax Rohmer, most famous for the Fu-Manchu series of books once paid a visit to a talking board (as they were known) when he was a struggling writer who had achieved little or no success. The board spelled out the word, C-H-I-N-A-M-A-N. The rest is history. I’m afraid nothing good happens to the people who stumble across my Ouija Board.

 

 

This novel is available now.

Pick up a copy of this novel from your favourite retailer or from one of the following links!

                             

 

 

Thank you to Ray Clark for being featured on my blog today!

 

About Ray Clark

The British Fantasy Society published Ray Clark's first work in 1995 - Manitou Man: The World of Graham Masterton, was nominated for both the World and British Fantasy Awards. In 2009, Ray's short story, Promises To Keep, made the final shortlist for the best short story award from The Tom Howard Foundation. Ray is based in Goole, and has set his Gardener and Reilly crime series in nearby Leeds.

 

#BlogTour #BookReview
Her Secret by Kelly Florentia
@kellyflorentia @UrbaneBooks @LoveBooksGroup

#BlogTour #BookReview Her Secret by Kelly Florentia @kellyflorentia @UrbaneBooks @LoveBooksGroupTitle: Her Secret

Author: Kelly Florentia

Series: No Way Back #2

Published by Urbane Publications on May 17, 2018

Genres: Contemporary Romance, Women's Fiction

Pages: 320

Format: eBook, ARC

Source: Love Books Group Tours

Book Rating: 8.5/10

 

Synopsis:

When one door closes, another opens, or so the saying goes.

After being in a long-term relationship for eight years, Audrey Fox never thought she’d tie the knot. But at the age of forty-two, fate throws her a lifeline and she finally has it all – a loving husband, successful career, beautiful family and loyal friends. Life couldn’t be better for Audrey … until a family member entrusts her with a secret that threatens trouble in paradise.

Lying to her new husband definitely wasn’t on the cards when Audrey took her vows, but now she feels there’s no other choice. She either keeps the secret or risks hurting the people that she loves. And then just when the dust seems to settle, an old flame turns up and creates a storm that could bring her world crashing down …

Unable to discuss her dilemma with her significant friends Louise and Tina, or sister-in-law Vicky, the cracks begin to show. Torn between her husband and the people she’s known and loved for years, Audrey’s perfect life begins to spiral out of control. Where do her loyalties lie and whom can she trust? Because there’s no smoke without fire and everyone has secrets … don’t they?


Review:

Unexpected, twisty, and clever!

Her Secret is an enticing tale that takes us into the life of Audrey Fox, a newlywed who’s happy, carefree marriage is about to take an unexpected turn when promises are made, secrets are kept, and lies are told.

The prose is smooth and intense. The characters are complex, secretive, witty, and loyal. And the well-crafted, multi-layered plot quickly unravels and intertwines to create a suspenseful, dramatic story about life, loss, love, marriage, family, romance, deception, manipulation, desperation, and obsession.

I have to admit that when I started Her Secret I didn’t realize it was a sequel and even though I found it to be a gripping, emotive read that kept me guessing from the very first page I would highly recommend you read No Way Back first to truly appreciate and enjoy the creative storyline and exceptional character development.

 

This book is available now.

Pick up a copy of this novel from your favourite retailer or from the following link!

 

 

Thank you to Kelly Florentia and Love Books Group Tours for providing me with a copy in exchange for an honest review.

 

About Kelly Florentia

Kelly Florentia was born and bred in north London, where she continues to live with her husband Joe. HER SECRET (2018) is her third novel and the sequel to NO WAY BACK (2017).

Kelly has always enjoyed writing and was a bit of a poet when she was younger. Before penning her debut The Magic Touch (2016), she wrote short stories for women’s magazines. To Tell a Tale or Two… is a collection of her short tales. In January 2017, her keen interest in health and fitness led to the release of Smooth Operator – a collection of twenty of her favourite smoothie recipes.

As well as writing, Kelly enjoys reading, running, drinking coffee, scoffing cakes, watching TV dramas, and spending way too much time on social media.

 

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